TRAILS OF NOMADS EXPEDITION DISCOVERS NEW FINDINGS IN ISRAEL

TRAILS OF NOMADS EXPEDITION DISCOVERS NEW FINDINGS IN ISRAEL

‘Trails of Nomads’ research expedition made a significant discovery in Israel. The researchers discovered an ancient building in the Old City of Jerusalem built by a member of the Kazakh tribe Arghyn (аргын). The facility dates back to the mid-13th century. The building is well-preserved and open for visitors.

RAFI KASIMOV, HISTORIAN

-His name was Argun El Kamili. That is how he is referred to in the Arabic sources and that was what was written on the sign. Obviously, Argun comes from the Kazakh tribe Arghyn. We don’t know much about this person’s life and how he ended up here. We only know that he was the sultan’s tailor. That is why his emblem is a piece of cloth.

Mamluk buildings can be seen in almost every street of ancient Jerusalem. They stand out due to the skillfully carved architectural elements and multi-color stone sidings. The building entrances were decorated with signs signifying the name and position of the person who built the building. Profound construction works were underway during the Kipchak-Mamluk period. Multiple mosques, schools and mausoleums are functional to this day. 

SAPAR ISKAKOV, EXPEDITION LEADER, TRAILS OF NOMADS

-We are now at the tomb of Turkan Khatun (Туркан-Хатун). She was the mother of Khwarazm-Shah. When the Mongols arrived in 1219, she tried to escape to Iran. She was later captured in Samarkand. After some time, she was possibly freed by Genghis Khan.

The holiest place in Judaism, the Western Wall, was also preserved due to the descendants of the Great Steppe. The place is visited by millions of tourists every year. 

SAPAR ISKAKOV, EXPEDITION LEADER, TRAILS OF NOMADS

-The first four courses of stone of this monumental construction were built during the Herodian reign before our era. The next seven courses belong to the Umayyad period. And the following 17 courses were built by our ancestors during the Kipchak-Mamluk era. This indicates our ancestors’ contribution in Jerusalem’s development.      

The Kazakh researchers believe that there are more undisclosed mysteries in Israel during the Mamluk period. They believe that a more in-depth research can help reveal new discoveries.