TRAILS OF NOMADS EXPEDITION

TRAILS OF NOMADS EXPEDITION

The Trails of Nomads expedition members arrived in Israel to learn about the Mamluk or the Islamic warriors’ impact on the Middle East history. (The Kazakh explorers met the local scientists and visited various historical sites). In the mid-13th century, a battle took place between the Mamluks and Mongols in Ain Jalut, Israel. (The Mamluks were the only warriors who bravely fought the deadly Mongol army).

SAPAR ISKAKOV, EXPEDITION LEADER, TRAILS OF NOMADS

-The Kipchaks from the Great Steppe made up 90% to 95% of the Mamluk army, while 70% to 80% of the Mongol warriors were also from the Great Steppe. So, our ancestors were from both sides of the conflict. 

The battle was a turning point in the history of the Middle East. The Mamluks forced the Mongol army to retreat. Sultan Baibars then focused on his campaign against the Crusaders after the victory. He conquered Arsuf and other cities during a 40-days siege.

RAFI KASIMOV, HISTORIAN

-After Baibars started digging a tunnel from the other side of the city, the Crusaders started negotiating their surrender. 

The Mamluks destroyed coastal cities to prevent the arrival of Crusader troops. Mamluks also took control of the settlements and cities in the country. The warriors focused on urban infrastructure development in these localities. The bridge constructed by the Mamluks still functions in the city of Lot. 

SAPAR ISKAKOV, EXPEDITION LEADER, TRAILS OF NOMADS

-At that time, postal communication played a crucial role. Letters from Cairo to Damascus were delivered in three days. Messengers had to change horses often. The Mamluks built this bridge because it was difficult to cross the lake on a horse. The bridges helped improve the communication system.   

There are many historical evidence of the Mamluk era on the territory of modern-day Israel. They indicate that warriors of the Great Steppe played an important role in the development of the Middle East.