Members of the ‘Trails of Nomads’ expedition went to Kiev

Kazakh scientists are set to recreate a unique musical instrument of the Kipchaks. Members of the ‘Trails of Nomads’ expedition went to Kiev to study this priceless finding which was discovered in the 80s during excavations on the left bank of the Dnieper River. According to archaeologists, the instrument dates back to the 13th century AD. The musical instrument is well preserved. The artifact helped to learn more about the lifestyles of the Kipchaks who lived in the territory of present-day Ukraine.

YAKOV GERSHKOVICH, DOCTOR OF HISTORICAL SCIENCES, UKRAINE:

- There was a lot of written, epic and historical evidence that the people who lived in Desht-I Qipchaq land had a well-developed musical culture and played musical instruments. This case was especially amazing because we finally discovered the evidence proving the epic and historical sources.

Ukrainian archeologists excavated the remains of several Kipchak khans. During the works, they found one of the richest burial sites, Khan Tigak’s tomb. It is located in south-eastern Ukraine and was full of unique items such as jewelry, weapons, as well as expensive dishes and clothing.

SAPAR ISKAKOV, EXPEDITION LEADER:

- Tigak Khan had excellent physique. He was 1 meter and 82 centimeters tall. He was a real warrior. The khan was buried in expensive clothes, which indicates his high status. He was dressed in a gold-embroidered caftan of a rare quality. Only Byzantine kings wore these garments at that time.

VITALIY OTROSCHENKO, DOCTOR OF HISTORICAL SCIENCES, UKRAINE:

- The vessel was hooked to the belt by the ring. The Chingul Khan had three belts with gold stitches and silver gilt inserts. This work, dated to the 3rd quarter of the 13th century, was performed by German jewelers from Rhein-Maas region.

The ‘Trails of Nomads’ expedition is set to make more discoveries. According to the expedition leader, their next destination is southern and eastern territories of Ukraine, where larger and more exciting Desht-i-Qipchaq monuments are still preserved.