Unique archeological artifacts are being examined in Eastern Kazakhstan

Remains of a 17 year old elite member of the Saka tribes were delivered to the local history museum in Oskemen. The burial site dating back to the 7th and 8th centuries BC was discovered during excavations at the Yeleke Sazy burial mound. The remains will be examined by experienced Kazakh and Russian anthropologists. According to scientists, the holes on the bones testify about the attempts to mummify the body.

YEGOR KITOV, RESEARCH FELLOW, INSTITUTE OF ETHNOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, RUSSIA:

- We suggest that the ancient people made a mummy from the body so that the members of the community could bid farewell to him. These holes demonstrate that manipulations were performed on the body to preserve it.

Archeologists have no doubt that the Saka tribes had advanced technologies in embalming and mummification. The nomads had good knowledge of metallurgy. The gold jewelry discovered in the burial site provided new information about the lifestyles of the Saka people.

LIDIYA TUROVA, CANDIDATE OF HISTORICAL SCIENCES:

- It shows that they had well-developed technologies. We can see that there were mines and pits at that time and new technologies for that age. It tells about their uniqueness.

The researchers plan to provide scientific facts to prove the uniqueness of the ancient man. They will take DNA samples from the bones extracted from the mound.

ZEINOLLA SAMASHEV, DOCTOR OF HISTORICAL SCIENCES:

- We will recreate this man’s appearance. The bone remains are of a good quality. We will perform DNA tests and other modern polygenetic tests to reveal the information about the time period when the man lived, his diseases and environment.

Scientists in Eastern Kazakhstan will continue searching for archeological findings. There are more than 200 unexplored burial mounds of the early Iron Age in Tarbagatai district.